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November 6th 2015

Statement by the Commissioner Katherine d’Entremont on the investigation of security services in governmental buildings

Friday, November 6, 2015

In 2002, the members of the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick adopted a new Official Languages Act. That is when the Commissioner’s position was created. 

Members of the Legislative Assembly have given the Commissioner two roles: to protect the language rights of Anglophones and Francophones of this province; and to promote the advancement of our two official languages.

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November 3rd 2015

Statement from the Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick in relation to the investigation pertaining to security services in provincial government buildings

Fredericton, November 3rd, 2015

As Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick, if I become aware of a potential significant violation to the Official Languages Act of New Brunswick (the “OLA”), I must take action. The purpose of an investigation is to shine a light on the root cause of a violation to the OLA and to find ways to correct the situation so that it does not repeat itself.

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September 22nd 2015

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends expanding and strengthening the role of the New Brunswick Translation Bureau

Fredericton, September 22, 2015 – The Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick, Katherine d’Entremont, suggests that all organizations subject to the Official Languages Act (OLA) be encouraged to use the services of the New Brunswick Translation Bureau. According to the Commissioner, this would allow for better quality assurance of documents published by government and public agencies. In addition, by translating a greater volume of words, the Bureau could increase its financial autonomy. It could therefore play an enhanced role in encouraging a more balanced use of the two official languages across government.

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June 18th 2015

The Commissioner of Official Languages presents her second annual report

Fredericton, June 18, 2015 – Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick, Katherine d’Entremont, is recommending that starting in 2020, bilingualism be a requirement for appointment to a senior public servant position in New Brunswick. In the meantime, the Commissioner recommends that a unilingual person appointed to a senior public servant position be required to attain an advanced level of proficiency in the other official language.

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April 10th 2015

The Official Languages Act and municipal and regional services

Fredericton, April 10, 2015 – In New Brunswick, all cities and some municipalities and regional service commissions must offer services to the public in both official languages. These services are outlined in a new factsheet published by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick.

“Local government is closest to citizens,” said Commissioner Katherine d’Entremont. “The Legislative Assembly recognized this in extending the application of the Official Languages Act to portions of the local government sector in 2002.”

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March 25th 2015

Two Languages: It's Good for Business

Fredericton, March 25, 2015 – Thanks to its two official languages, New Brunswick has a customer contact centre and back office industry generating $1.4 billion worth of export revenue annually for the province. It is estimated that this sector generates more than 15 000 jobs. In addition, both unilingual and bilingual New Brunswickers benefit from this economic activity given that the firms attracted to the province by the bilingual workforce have created two unilingual jobs for every bilingual job.

Those are some of the findings of a study co-authored by economist Pierre-Marcel Desjardins and economic development specialist David Campbell and commissioned by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick.

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February 25th 2015

Justice and language rights

Fredericton, February 25, 2015 – English and French are the official languages of the New Brunswick courts. What does this actually mean for New Brunswickers? A new factsheet from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick answers that question.

In New Brunswick, all individuals have the right to use English or French before a court. “Whether an Anglophone has to appear in Caraquet or a Francophone has to appear before a court in Woodstock, every person has the right to use the official language of his or her choice before the provincial courts,” explained Commissioner Katherine d’Entremont. “Moreover, the Official Languages Act (OLA) stipulates that no person shall be placed at a disadvantage by reason of his or her choice of language.”

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January 21st 2015

Linguistic obligations of policing services explained

Fredericton, January 21, 2015 – The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for New Brunswick is releasing today on its website a new factsheet on the linguistic obligations of police forces in the province.

“All police forces in New Brunswick, whether municipal, regional, or the RCMP, are required to serve citizens in the official language of their choice,” reminded Commissioner Katherine d’Entremont.

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